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Soundprint programming for 2012
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September 2012
September 14 Soundprint Science:P2P1
Pole to Pole:
SOUNDPRINT traveled inside the Arctic and Antarctic circles as part of the International Polar Year Media Collaboration, Pole to Pole.

HOUR 1 : The Hidden Clues of Climate Change
Time Capsule in Siberia
A frozen lake in the Arctic Circle is telling us how sensitive the poles are to climate change. Moira Rankin takes us to Lake El'gygytgyn and reports on the 3.6 million year record of climate change that scientists have unearthed from the lake's bottom.

When the Snow Melts on Svalbard
The Polar Regions may be the "canary in the coal mine" for climate change. Visit the northernmost scientific outpost in the world, with Irene Quaile of Radio Deutsche-Welle, and hear what they're discovering about the polar climate.


September 7 Soundprint Science:P2P1
Pole to Pole:
SOUNDPRINT traveled inside the Arctic and Antarctic circles as part of the International Polar Year Media Collaboration, Pole to Pole.

HOUR 1 : The Hidden Clues of Climate Change
Time Capsule in Siberia
A frozen lake in the Arctic Circle is telling us how sensitive the poles are to climate change. Moira Rankin takes us to Lake El'gygytgyn and reports on the 3.6 million year record of climate change that scientists have unearthed from the lake's bottom.

When the Snow Melts on Svalbard
The Polar Regions may be the "canary in the coal mine" for climate change. Visit the northernmost scientific outpost in the world, with Irene Quaile of Radio Deutsche-Welle, and hear what they're discovering about the polar climate.


August 2012
August 31 Soundprint Science:P2P1
Pole to Pole:
SOUNDPRINT traveled inside the Arctic and Antarctic circles as part of the International Polar Year Media Collaboration, Pole to Pole.

HOUR 1 : The Hidden Clues of Climate Change
Time Capsule in Siberia
A frozen lake in the Arctic Circle is telling us how sensitive the poles are to climate change. Moira Rankin takes us to Lake El'gygytgyn and reports on the 3.6 million year record of climate change that scientists have unearthed from the lake's bottom.

When the Snow Melts on Svalbard
The Polar Regions may be the "canary in the coal mine" for climate change. Visit the northernmost scientific outpost in the world, with Irene Quaile of Radio Deutsche-Welle, and hear what they're discovering about the polar climate.


August 24 Soundprint Science:P2P1
Pole to Pole:
SOUNDPRINT traveled inside the Arctic and Antarctic circles as part of the International Polar Year Media Collaboration, Pole to Pole.

HOUR 1 : The Hidden Clues of Climate Change
Time Capsule in Siberia
A frozen lake in the Arctic Circle is telling us how sensitive the poles are to climate change. Moira Rankin takes us to Lake El'gygytgyn and reports on the 3.6 million year record of climate change that scientists have unearthed from the lake's bottom.

When the Snow Melts on Svalbard
The Polar Regions may be the "canary in the coal mine" for climate change. Visit the northernmost scientific outpost in the world, with Irene Quaile of Radio Deutsche-Welle, and hear what they're discovering about the polar climate.


August 17 Soundprint Science:P2P1
Pole to Pole:
SOUNDPRINT traveled inside the Arctic and Antarctic circles as part of the International Polar Year Media Collaboration, Pole to Pole.

HOUR 1 : The Hidden Clues of Climate Change
Time Capsule in Siberia
A frozen lake in the Arctic Circle is telling us how sensitive the poles are to climate change. Moira Rankin takes us to Lake El'gygytgyn and reports on the 3.6 million year record of climate change that scientists have unearthed from the lake's bottom.

When the Snow Melts on Svalbard
The Polar Regions may be the "canary in the coal mine" for climate change. Visit the northernmost scientific outpost in the world, with Irene Quaile of Radio Deutsche-Welle, and hear what they're discovering about the polar climate.


August 10 Soundprint Science:WoV1

WORLD OF VIRUSES

Feared by many, and little understood, the world of viruses permeates our lives. Join us as we explore what science is now telling us about viruses from: hospitals in Minnesota to clinics in South Africa; research labs in Nebraska to mosquito haunts in Peru and state fairs in Maryland.

Hour 1: Garden Variety Viruses
Measles:What's at Stake produced by Barbara Bogaev
Measles, once a rite of passage for hundreds of thousands of American children every year, has largely been eliminated in this country. Producer Barbara Bogaev explores why minor outbreaks are becoming more common, and why even small outbreaks have public health officials worried.

Mosquitoes in Iquitos produced by Dan Charles
The Front Line in the battle against mosquito-borne viruses is a bustling Peruvian metropolis on the Amazon River.


August 3 Soundprint Science:WoV2

WORLD OF VIRUSES
Feared by many, and little understood, the world of viruses permeates our lives. Join us as we explore what science is now telling us about viruses from: hospitals in Minnesota to clinics in South Africa; research labs in Nebraska to mosquito haunts in Peru and state fairs in Maryland.

HOUR 2 World of Viruses: The Elusive Viruses
HPV - the Shy Virus produced by Jean Snedegar
A hidden killer lurks in the shadows -- also in your car, on your keyboard, and even on your kitchen table -- but it attacks very few people. Producer Jean Snedegar tracks the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) - a puzzling, paradoxical virus.

The Clinic produced by Gemma Hooley
Producer Gemma Hooley follows a determined health-care worker who's field-testing an innovative, ambitious, yet simple weapon in the region's battle against HIV/AIDS.


July 2012
July 27 Life at McMurdo Radio Speaker: Listen Online
The science station called McMurdo has been operating on the southern tip of the continent since 1956. It’s an important research center, attracting geologists, physicists, engineers, hydrologists, pilots, and just plain adventure-seekers. McMurdo Station has grown so much, in fact, that it’s really a town unto itself. It’s got a harbor, three airfields, a heliport, over a hundred buildings, and a bowling alley. After all, if people are going to work in such a bleak outpost, they need some recreation! About a thousand people work at McMurdo in the summer -- 200 in the dead of winter -- and the scientists depend on the non-scientists to keep the place humming. SOUNDPRINT went to McMurdo as part of the International Polar Year Media Collaboration Pole to Pole to cover a scientific project. While we were there, we met the diverse and colorful group of people who constitute LIFE AT MCMURDO.

Gibtown Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Gibsonton, Florida is the retirement and off-season home for hundreds of carnival and circus show people. Called "Gibtown" by many of its residents, the town was at one time considered the oddest place is America. You could walk into any restaurant and find The World's Only Living Half Girl sipping coffee with her 8 foot 4 inch husband, Giant Al. They, along with The Lobster Man, Alligator Skin Man and the Monkey Girl, among others, made their living touring with carnival sideshows. The sideshows are mostly gone. We take a look back at sideshows through the lens of Gibtown.
July 20 Chickens Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Producer Adi Gevins presents both a lighthearted and serious examination of chickens and their relationship to humans in historical, cultural, economic and institutional contexts.

Life before the Computer Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Remember the first television set your family got? Or the first transistor radio that was really all your own? Our relationship with technology is oddly intimate, worming its way into even our most evocative memories. Producer Ilene Segalove talks to people with humorous memories of the "latest technologies" of their childhoods, now faded into obscurity in the computer age.
July 13 Bean Jumping Radio Speaker: Listen Online
This is the story of the immigration experience of two sister communities: one in the Ecuadorian Mountains, and the other in Suffolk County, on Long Island in New York. A 2008 hate-crime killing brought to light a pattern of abuse, persecution, and violence that shocked the residents of Patchogue, a quiet coastal suburban "Anytown, USA" -- but maybe didn't shock the residents of the community in the shadows, or their family members 3000 miles away. Producer Charles Lane reported on and covered the local story, and now brings us the international story. He found that the meaning of "American Dream" might be changing, and he discovered a Latino Dream.

Dream Deferred Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Each year 5,000 refugee children arrive in the U.S. penniless and alone, seeking asylum and freedom. A third are locked up - some alongside violent offenders. Many are deported back to traumatic home situations. The U.S. government does not provide them with lawyers, yet whether they can stay legally is decided in court. Dream Deferred follows two of these children, Juan Pablo from Honduras and Jimmy from Punjab, India. Why did they leave? What dreams are they chasing? How did they get here and where are they today?
July 6 Mosquitoes in Iquitos Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Iquitos, Peru, home to nearly 400,000 people, is a living laboratory. Researchers there are tracing the spread of lethal dengue fever by going door to door in neighborhoods throughout the city. They're mapping the spread of the virus, as well as the mosquitoes that carry it. Producer Dan Charles follows researchers as they try to figure out what people can do to stop it.

The Bucket Radio Speaker: Listen Online
When you lower a bucket into the ocean, from a pier or off the side of a ship, it may well seem to come up containing nothing but clear water. But scientists now know that every teaspoonful of that water can contain a hundred-million tiny viruses. That sounds sinister, but without them the ocean couldn't function. Every day, marine viruses invade bacteria and other organisms, releasing their nutrients to the underwater food chain. Only since the late 1980's have marine biologists been aware of how many viruses are indigenous to the ocean, and how powerful and varied they are. They differ radically in size, shape, and DNA blueprint -- so much so that totally novel DNA keeps being discovered, with implications for anything from anti-aging creams to anti-cancer drugs and evolutionary science. Far from being a bad thing, these amazing marine viruses are useful, dramatic, novel, and dynamic; imagine that all hiding in your bucket of clear water! Producer Judith Kampfner travels from the coast of Plymouth in England to Santa Monica to meet with some of the intrepid pioneers who are on the trail of these new natural marvels.

Photograph of algae, Emiliania Huxleyi, was provided with permission by The Natural History Museum, London (Dr. Jeremy Young) and University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Angie Fox) / 2009.

June 2012
June 29 Measles: What's at Stake Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Measles, once a rite of passage for thousands of children (and their parents), has largely been eliminated in this country, thanks to the MMR vaccine. How this happened is an illustration of herd immunity: that is, that although not everyone is vaccinated against measles, enough people have so that the virus has a hard time finding a new host. However, recent, small outbreaks in the U.S. have public health officials worried. The outbreaks mean that herd immunity is breaking down. Producer Barbara Bogaev explores why even a minor Measles outbreak can be a major risk, and how some community pressures, social stigmas, and disputed medical reports have lead to the breakdown.

Relating to Dad Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Does Father know best? Some teenagers think Dads are dominating, disciplinarians who don't always have respect for the thoughts of their young minds. Dads dismiss the day-to-day obstacles of peer pressure, school, and for some teens, work. Producer Joe Gill talks with 17 year-old Cristin about "what a father is," or "what a father is supposed to be" or "why a father is important in a woman's life". Blending audio diaries and conversations, Relating to Dad takes a look at one teen's view about "the father of the imagination" who fills in for the absent, real father.
June 22 The Color of Shakespeare Radio Speaker: Listen Online
At countless times in America, and for countless groups of citizens, the question has come up: Who "owns" Shakespeare? Who is it meant for, and to whom does it mean what? This is a particularly poignant question in the case of African-Americans, whom some have sought to exclude from the Bard's work. This story looks at minstrel show parodies of Shakespeare, color-blind casting of Shakespeare, and the African-American experience with Shakespeare. Produced by Richard Paul and narrated by Sam Waterston, The Color of Shakespeare was made possible with support from the Folger Library.

The Busker and the Diva Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Margaret Leng Tan and James Graseck were boyfriend and girlfriend while they both attended Julliard in 1970. Margaret was offered a place by a Juilliard scout who came to her native Singapore. At the age of 16, she became a piano major in New York. She loved New York, but James who came from Long Island, found it dirty - hating the streets and the noise. That hasn’t stopped him in his chosen line of work -- for the last 20 years he’s been a busker - a street musician, well known in the subway system. Margaret meanwhile has had a long career as an unconventional pianist as a protege of John Cage and in the words of the New York Times "a diva of the toy piano". While at Julliard, Margaret and James drifted apart because they were studying different instruments and had different courses, and they lost touch when they graduated. Their very different musical lives took them in different directions but recently, their paths crossed again, in the bowels of Grand Central station. Their meeting quickly developed once again into an intimate relationship, physically, emotionally and professionally. Producer Judith Kampfner traces their reunion and the obstacles to their relationship, which lie more in their approaches to music making and their polarized positions in the musical spectrum than their bond as individuals. This is the story of both their personal romance, and their professional lives.
June 15 War and Forgiveness Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Memorial Day is a day of remembrance of wars won and lost. Often, we think of the battles and the victories. At times, we consider the inevitable war crimes: the massacres, rapes and other atrocities. Rarely do we consider the perspectives of those who are responsible as well as those who are injured. In a special hour long documentary, War and Forgiveness, we present two sides of the equation: the victims and the perpetrators of wartime atrocities. WNYC, RADIO NETHERLANDS, and SOUNDPRINT have collaborated on a two part program that looks at women in Korea who were commandeered to have sex with Japanese soldiers during World War II and Dutch soldiers who carried out a torture campaign in Indonesia. As different as their stories are, they reach the same conclusion: the need for a moral apology from the government.


June 8 Birthday Suit Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Janet Jackson reveals a breast and there is an uproar, a woman breast feeds in a mall and is thrown out, a child of 4 is naked on a beach and the life guard tells him to put his swimsuit on. Around the world there is topless bathing but it is rare in this country. Yet one in four Americans admit to having skinny dipped. Are we hypocrites? We obviously secretly like swimming nude so why don't we do it all the time?

The Internaional Naturist Federation says that nudism or naturism is " A way of life in harmony with nature, characterized by the practice of communal nudity with the intent of encouraging self respect, respect for other and the environment". I don't know that going naked makes you respect the environment more but surely it must lead to a greater appreciation of the different shapes and sizes bodies come in and that might conceivably make us less body conscious and phobic about fat and imperfections.

Naturist camps are almost always in a mixed social setting. Detractors say that naturist is a code for sex but perhaps men and women start to notice their differences less? And what about naked children? Naturists warmly encourage children. Would being at one of these camps cause psychological harm? And then how hygenic really are these places? At the end of summer, before the chill winds blow, reporter Judith Kampfner visits a naturist camp and yes, complies with the no clothes rule. And that's no clothes when dancing, horsebackriding, kayaking, or in the canteen. It's not something that this reporter relishes. She is short and is used to her everyday weapons of stacked heels. Like most women she uses clother to camoflage faults. Baring all may mean feeling vulnerable and stupid. But the nudists who come year after year find it liberating, relaxing, democratic, wonderfully cheap, wildly romantic. Perhaps our reporter will become comfortable in her birthday suit. Now why do we say 'suit'?


Summer Triptych Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Summer afternoon. The two most beautiful words in the English language, according to Henry James. While away the afternoon at a ballgame. Take your kid to the state fair. Go for a ride on a Ferris wheel. It's the one time of year when nature sets out to amuse us. Of course, it's an illusion. You need only be stuck behind a desk and looking out the office window to get a reality check. But if summer is an illusion, at least it's a grand illusion, and well worth the trouble. Producers David Isay, Dan Collison, and Neenah Ellis take us back stage behind the sets, props, facades, carnivals, games and country fairs. We're going to meet the technicians of summer, the people who work to make it happen.
June 1 Paris: Heat Wave Radio Speaker: Listen Online
In August 2003, European suffered the worst heat wave in at least 500 years. Many weather records were set that month. Great Britain reported its hottest day ever. Forest fires raged in much of southern Europe, themselves causing deaths. Crops withered and trees died. One of the cities hit hardest was Paris. Although the high heat started in early August, it was nearly mid-month, after hundreds of people had been killed, before the French government realized that the heat wave had turned deadly in Paris. Before the heat wave was over, the city’s morgues had to requisition refrigerator trucks just to hold the excessive number of dead bodies. More than 1,000 Parisians had died of dehydration, heat stroke and other ailments caused by high heat, a disproportionate fraction of which were single, elderly women. Producer Dan Grossman tells us the story of the Paris Heat Wave, and the signs that other parts of the world, including parts of the U.S. Midwest, could soon face significantly increased climate extremes.

Cities of the Plain Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Urban forests in desert settings -- no, this is not about transferring Central Park to L.A. Arid environments have their own "green" cover, and cities destroy and ignore that vegetation to their peril. Veteran producer Bill Drummond travels out West from mountains to shore to ask: when are trees beneficial and when are they not? This program airs as part of our ongoing series, Tales from Urban Forests.

May 2012
May 25 Foot and Mouth Disease Radio Speaker: Listen Online
The virus that causes FMD (Foot and Mouth Disease) is one of the most feared among farmers. It can decimate herds. Even if animals recover, beef and milk production can be severely impacted. FMD is so contagious, and such a dreaded disease, that animal health agencies in outbreak countries fear stigmatization if outbreaks aren't eradicated quickly. Draconian measures such as mass killings and burning of carcasses are often employed, as the effectiveness of vaccines is short-lived, and the FMD virus has seven distinct varieties. As part of our special World of Virus series, producer Judith Kampfner takes us to the UK, where the damage from an FMD outbreak 10 years ago is still fresh in farmers' minds, and to South Korea, which has dealt with 5 outbreaks in the past decade, to show us the devastation of FMD, why it's so hard to eradicate, and the drastic steps taken to keep the US FMD-free.

Where the Buffalo Roam
Hong Kong is largely known for its sophisticated mix of every thing modern, and its thriving economy, but this island city of over 7 million people also has a thriving animal kingdom. Like their human counterparts, these animals are not native to the land. Sarah Passmore of Radio Television Hong Kong introduces these animals, from "Pui Pui" the celebrity crocodile to the Rhesus Monkeys that terrorize women and children. For our Global Perspective Series on Escape, Sarah Passmore shows us around Hong Kong where the Buffalo roam.
May 18 Hockey Diaries: Ready to Play Radio Speaker: Listen Online
At the start of the 2008-2009 hockey season, two Canadian players packed up their gear and headed east to Washington DC, home of the NHL Washington Capitals. Nineteen-year-old British Columbia rookie Karl Alzner was hoping to win a coveted spot on the team. Saskatchewan veteran Brooks Laich had just signed a new 3-year contract and was anxious to get started. Both players carried audio diaries that they would use to document their season. This is the story of that unfolded, from the exhaustion and suspense of training camp all the way to the exhilaration and emotion of the playoffs. The grind of long road-trips, the challenges of injuries and personal setbacks, the politics of the locker room, the expectations of fans, family and self… and the relentless pressure that comes with chasing hockey's biggest prize, the Stanley Cup: with all this, Karl Alzner and Brooks Laich bring us the story of everything it takes to make it as a professional hockey player.

Van Gogh and Gauguin Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin were two of the greatest painters of the late 19th century. A brief but intense collaboration occurred between the two artists. They met in Paris in the autumn of 1887. Each man tried to learn from the other and admired the other's work. Their collaboration was marked at first by mutual support and dialogue, but there was also competition and friction. The men differed sharply in their views on art: Gauguin favored working from memory and allowing abstract mental processes to shape his images, while Vincent held an unshakeable reverence for the physical reality of the observable world of models and Nature. This is reflected in the very different techniques each artist used. But toward the end of 1888, a series of violent incidents around Christmas Eve brought a dramatic end to their collaboration. This is the story of their personal and professional relationship.
May 11 Sam's Story Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Sam was brought to the United States by his parents as a young child, but his family overstayed their visas. Over the past fourteen years, Sam has grown from a small boy to a young man — taught in American schools and churches, he grew up like any other American kid. But when he was asked to fill in his social security number on a financial aid form, he began to realize the consequences of being undocumented. Long Haul Productions picks up Sam's story as he's graduating from high school in Elkhart, Indiana, and looking to start his first year of college.

Citizenship Diary Radio Speaker: Listen Online
How many stars and how many stripes and what do they mean? You need to know this and many more flag questions to pass the US Naturalization test. Judith Kampfner recorded an audio diary about the process of becoming an American citizen, and about what it was like taking on a second identity. Was it a betrayal of her British roots? Or was it a very logical step to take for someone who thinks of herself as in internationalist? Many more people are becoming dual or multiple citizens today as more countries accept the idea - Mexico, Columbia and the Dominican Republic for instance. Does this dilute the concept of citizenship? Indeed perhaps we are less likely to identify ourselves as citizens today because we are part of a global culture and travel more. Kampfner discovers that going through the paperwork, the test and the ceremony does not help her feel American - that is something she and all the others who are processed have to do for themselves.
May 4 The President's Mother Radio Speaker: Listen Online
In 2010 President Barack Obama returned to Indonesia, where he lived for 4 years as a child, and noted how much it had changed. His first experience of that country was when he relocated there with his mother, Ann Dunham, and her second husband. Dunham was an anthropologist, a micro-financier, and an advocate for improving women's lives in developing nations, especially Indonesia. She did this with incredible charm and charisma, qualities some see in the President. Producer Judith Kampfner spoke with Ann's friends and colleagues, along with Obama's half-sister Maya, to learn all about the President's Mother.

Children and God Radio Speaker: Listen Online
The three major monotheistic religions operate from the assumption that: We have the truth, we have a privileged position, we are above others who do not believe as we do, and we are against others who do not believe as we do. This line of thinking creates strong communities of people with deep, abiding faith. But the dark side of these ideas can be seen in Srebrenica, the West Bank and the World Trade Center. The religious person learns concepts like "God" and "My Religion" at the same time as concepts like "Green" and "Family." By preadolescence, these ideas have been planted quite deeply. This program takes a look at the results by following three 12-year olds - an Orthodox Jew, a Muslim and an Evangelical Christian -- as they pursue their religious education. We hear the songs they sing, the prayers they chant, the lessons they read and how their formal and informal training drives them to believe that, because of their religion, they have a special and exclusive relationship with God.

April 2012
April 27 Totally Hidden Video Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Through the medium they call 'totally hidden video,' a group of Harlem 7th graders present a disarming perspective on life in their neighborhoods, at school and on the playgrounds, and at home. Producer Mary Beth Kirchner first explained the use of microphones and tape recorders to a small workshop of 7th graders at The Children's Storefront school, and then let them take over. They've selected the subject matter and conducted the interviews for this humorous and touching self-portrait.

Revenge Radio Speaker: Listen Online
It seems we all love to hear revenge stories -- the petty ones and the grand -- even when they are painful or the recipient is blameless. And we seem to love to tell revenge stories about ourselves -- even stories that make us look childish or venal. Revenge visits the unspoken dark place where revenge impulses lie through the stories of people who have planned revenge and those who have carried it out.
April 20 Upright Grand Radio Speaker: Listen Online
A document of the poignant moment in the life of Producer Tim Wilson's own mother, a daunting figure and a once-accomplished pianist, now diagnosed with Alzheimer's, when she is forced to leave her apartment, her pearls, and her 'upright grand' to enter 'a home.' Upright Grand turns into a searching examination of the often ambiguous relationship between a mother and son.

Hospice Chronicles Radio Speaker: Listen Online
It's been forty years since St. Christopher's Hospice – the first modern hospice – opened in a suburb of London. Since then, millions of people around the world have chosen hospice at the end of their lives, with many patients choosing to receive care in their homes. Over the course of eight months, team Long Haul followed two hospice volunteers through their training and first assignments in patients' homes. Trained to provide "respite care," the volunteers set out to give family members a break from their caretaking responsibilities. And while one has a chance to reflect on her patient's life in a intimate setting, another gets to explore death in a rather unexpected way – a way that training never could have prepared him for.
April 13 The Public Green and the Poor Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Numerous times in American history, reformers have sought to help the poor by putting them amidst nature -- the belief being that physical beauty can make beautiful people. It seems like an odd idea. But Thomas Jefferson believed it fervently. And it's also the reason Central Park exists in New York and the town of Greenbelt exists in Maryland. This program, from Producer Richard Paul, looks at a time in our past when nature was used to uplift the poor. It airs as part of our ongoing series, Tales from Urban Forests.

The Evolution Boomerang Radio Speaker: Listen Online
As humans continue to make their imprint on Earth, they find they are making a noticeable difference in the evolution of different species. The Evolution Boomerang looks at the effect humans are having on insects, fish and certain kinds of bacterium, and how that evolution is in turn affecting humans.

Supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

April 6 The Traveler Radio Speaker: Listen Online
The monarch butterfly is the greatest marathon runner of the insect world. Each year in May hundreds of millions of them take off from their winter quarters in Morelia, Mexico to begin a perilously delicate 3000 mile journey north. With luck, three months later by the human calendar but three generations later in butterfly time, the Monarchs reach northern United States and southern Canada. In late summer their journey begins again, and they arrive back in their winter roosts around the time of the Mexican Day of the Dead in late November. And while the monarch butterfly is beautiful, it is also mysterious. We don't know how the monarchs know where to go. We have no idea how they navigate the annual route along identical flight paths, right down to nesting on the same trees in the same fields year after year. And we don't know how they pass on the knowledge of those routes to the future generations that make the return trip. Producer Chris Brookes takes us on an in-depth journey with the monarch butterfly, and looks at three factors that may be threatening its existence.

The Last Out Radio Speaker: Listen Online
If you are a baseball junkie, this program is for you. Producers Moira Rankin and Dan Collison explore the baseball fan's addiction to the game as they follow two die-hard enthusiasts to see how they endure the off-season in anticipation of the spring.

March 2012
March 30 Original Kasper's Hot Dogs Radio Speaker: Listen Online
During its seventy year tenure, a hot dog stand in Oakland has become an anchor for residents of the city's Temescal neighborhood in good times and bad. This is the story of Kasper's Original Hot Dogs.

Rodeo Life Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Rodeo isn't just a sport, it's a way of life. From youngsters just starting out in junior competitions to seasoned veterans vying for national championships, rodeo cowboys are a dedicated group of athletes. They spend long hours traveling from rodeo to rodeo for the chance to risk injury and court glory atop bucking horses and bulls, or to see who's the fastest to rope a calf or wrestle a steer to the ground, all with no guarantee of a paycheck at days end. Producer Matt McCleskey talked to rodeo cowboys about their rough and tumble sport and prepared this documentary.
March 23 Every Tree Tells A Story Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Urban forests provide economic, social and cultural value to neighborhoods and cities. But what are the needs and expectations different ethnic and racial groups have for green space? And how does understanding those needs draw tighter communities? Producer Judith Kampfner compares the cities of New York and London, and the approach new and old ethnic racial and immigrant groups have towards green space. This program airs as part of our ongoing series, Tales from Urban Forests.

Photo of Max's cement square from the revitalized New York City park.


April in Paris Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Ever since Ben Franklin fell in love with it and came home with tales of 'Gay Paree', Americans have held to golden images of the city: the capital of eating and drinking, of glamorous night life, of perfume. Even if we haven't been there we can see in our mind's eye the barges gliding along the Seine, the lovers kissing in the streets and on park benches; we can smell the exotic cooking, and over it all we can hear the wistful accordion music. But how much of all this is myth, how much reality? Producer Alice Furlaud explores the question, starting with the myth that Vernon Duke created in his nostalgic song, 'April in Paris'. Don't come in April, she advises, better wait 'til May.
March 16 Survivor Radio Speaker: Listen Online
In 1942 a US Navy destroyer was shipwrecked off Newfoundland. Of the few who survived, one man, Lanier Phillips, was black. The rescuers, never having seen a black man before, tried to scrub his skin clean and white. This is a story about growing up with fear in segregated Georgia, enlisting in a segregated navy, facing death in the icy North Atlantic, and a rescue which galvanized a man to fight racial discrimination.

Remains of the Sword: Armenian Orphans Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Ninety years ago, up to 1.5 million Armenians were deported and died at the hands of the Ottoman rulers of Turkey. But it is believed that Turkish families saved thousands of orphaned Armenian children secretly. Some children who had been adopted were then forcibly taken away from their Turkish families by foreign troops and sent to orphanages in Europe. Until now, the very existence of the children has remained largely an untold story, buried along with those who died between 1915 and 1916. But their family members are slowly uncovering the stories of those Armenian orphans. The issue still remains extremely contentious, and the story of Armenian orphans is now becoming one of most sensitive and emotionally charged issues in Turkish society. Producer Dorian Jones exposes how descendants of Armenian orphans are discovering their family histories.
March 9 The Urban Forest Healing Center Radio Speaker: Listen Online
From the time he wrote ‘Walden – Life in the Woods’ philosopher Henry David Thoreau understood the restorative value of trees to the human soul. More than 100 years later researchers are discovering that a pleasurable walk among trees and green space can calm an active child, refresh a tired mind, and make all of us feel better. The view of a tree outside a window can make an office worker more productive, a hospital stay shorter, or a prison sentence more bearable. Even in the most deprived inner city, trees and green space around buildings reduce crime and violence as well as promote a sense of community and well-being. In our series, Tales from Urban Forests, Jean Snedegar explores the power of trees to restore us, body and mind.

Watershed 263 Radio Speaker: Listen Online
In urban areas across the country, trees and grass have been replaced with pavement and concrete. Storm water runoff from these paved surfaces in cities can be saturated with harmful substances such as gasoline, oil and trash. We head to the inner city of Baltimore where partners have joined forces to clean up the runoff flowing into the harbor and into the Chesapeake Bay, and at the same time to improve the quality of life for the residents living there.
March 2 The Music Boat Man Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Reinier Sijpkens travels around the world making magic and music for children. At home in the Netherlands, he haunts the canals of Amsterdam playing barrel organ, trumpet and conch. Producer Dheera Sujan meets with this illusive magical character who says his day job is "developing his soul."

How Do You Get to Carnegie Hall? Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Practice, practice, practice - and that is what millions of people across the country have done for generations. Piano lessons led to recitals, with dreams of glory dancing in their heads - or at the least their doting parents and relatives. What happened after all of those hours of agonizing scale runs and finger exercises? Did it all go for naught - to be wasted away in parlor entertainment with endless renditions of Heart and Soul? Composer Brenda Hutchinson set out across the U.S. to find out - with a U-Haul truck, a piano and a microphone.

February 2012
February 24 Touchstones of Reality Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Having a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia or severe bipolar disorder isn’t easy for patients, or for their families. In the early days of mental illness, the pressures can tear families apart, and many of them don't know where to turn. As patients and caretakers age, things can get even tougher. While mental health services may provide some support, it's often family members who remain the only "touchstones of reality" for the person suffering with a severe mental illness. Producer Jean Snedegar speaks to several families who face the difficult challenge of supporting their mentally ill family members throughout the course of their lives.

Lost in America Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Four people living on the edge--drug addicts, a prostitute and a blind woman--recount their journeys to a new life, revealing the connections between home and homelessness along the way. Producer Helen Borten brings us "Lost in America." This program won an EMMA award from the National Women's Political Caucus for Best Radio Documentary.
February 17 The Spoken Word Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Join us on a journey through the rich tradition of performance poetry, set in Washington DC's famous and eclectic U Street corridor. Our program takes you from memories of the live poetry clubs that emerged there in the 1960's, through the D.C. riots that saw venues closing down and artists scattering to the West Coast, to the modern day renaissance of the spoken word tradition. Our story is narrated by performance poets M'wili Yaw Askari, Toni Ashanti Lightfoot and Matthew Payne.

Going Home to the Blues Radio Speaker: Listen Online
People say going down south is like going home. Take a trip to the Mississippi Delta to find the true meaning of the Blues. Everyone has hard times throughout their lives, but does that classify as the Blues? Producers Askia Muhammed and Debra Morris search for an answer while going home.
February 10 Mother-In-Law Radio Speaker: Listen Online
The relationship between mother- in –law and daughter/son in law has no rules and it’s easy to take a false step. Producer Judith Kampfner is on her own journey to be, if not the perfect mother-in-law, then at least one that breaks stereotypes and avoids common pitfalls. In the process, she interviews other mother-in-laws, many from different backgrounds, as well as daughter and son in-laws. Far from isolating ourselves in nuclear units, she finds that we work at and care for extended and blended connections more than ever.

The United States of Dating Radio Speaker: Listen Online
A producer's quest for real stories of how people meet each other in the current dating environment, and how they negotiate their dating relationships. Along the way, we'll hear from matchmakers, relationship experts and common-or-garden daters. We'll explore how the written word still rules romance and dating etiquette -- from staccato text-message shorthand to classified ads, postcards and email. We'll meet the Dating Coach who advises clients on putting their best face forward; New York City's own cupid cab driver who tries his hand at amateur matchmaking in Manhattan gridlock; a political activist who runs a booming online dating service for like-minded lefties (motto: "take action, get action"); and a woman who blogs her private dating activities in a public online diary... with some surprising results. This program airs as part of our special international collaboration, Global Perspectives: Romance Series.
February 3 Sleeping through the Dream Radio Speaker: Listen Online
In 1963 Dr. Martin Luther King led the March on Washington and spoke the famous words "I have a dream." Then 18 year-old Producer Askia Muhammad was, as he recalls, 'sleeping through the dream.' Growing up in Los Angeles, Muhammad was far away from the civil rights uproar and any self-proclaimed political consciousness. Now 40 years later, Muhammad revisits his youth with two close friends. Join us for the journey of a young man's political awakening during a time of intense social unrest.

Keysville, GA: Old Dreams, New South Radio Speaker: Listen Online
On January 4, 1988, 63-year-old Emma Gresham became the first black mayor - the first mayor in half a century- of Keysville, Georgia. She won the election over her opponent by 10 votes. In the town courthouse, on a trailer mounted on cinderblocks, a banner reads: Justice Knows No Boundaries. It's a constant reminder of both the town's troubled history and the dreams the mayor has for the town. In this small, mostly black, southern town, Emma Gresham employed education, patience, and political action, along with her famous biscuits, to realize her dream of a better life for her constituents. Producer Dan Collison takes us to Keysville for a look at the struggle for survival in the town that time forgot.

January 2012
January 27 Traffic Islands:Dividing Lines Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Traffic Islands: Dividing Lines This documentary explores the collective narrative created by people whose lives intersect in different ways with traffic islands and streetscapes. From a scientist trying to rationalize urban wildlife patterns, to a man who makes a living on the street corner, to people who use the streetscape to memorialize loved ones: what they have in common is that they map out private parts of their lives on the public traffic grid. We'll hear about this traffic island life in stories from the medians, as part of the international documentary collaboration, Global Perspectives on Islands.

Yellow and Black Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Talk about taxis as a guilty pleasure! Whether it's riding in style on the streets of New York (avoiding the hustle, bustle, and pain of the Subway), or zipping across London's spiraling maze of cross-streets (never doubting your intrepid guide's sense of direction), producer Judith Kampfner takes us on a tour of Taxi drivers -- the rough-edged New York City cabbies, and the traditional, vintage hacks of London.
January 20 HPV - the Shy Virus Radio Speaker: Listen Online
The Human Papillomavirus - or HPV - is a common virus that touches billions of human beings in one way or another - from a tiny wart on the hand to invasive cancer. HPV is a major health threat worldwide, yet mostly harmless. The virus can "hide" for years from a person's immune system - with no apparent ill effects - then awaken and create deadly disease. This is the story of a virus that often doesn't act as scientists expect it to - a puzzling, paradoxical virus. HPV, the Shy Virus is part of the series "World of Viruses".

The photograph showing the structure of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV), is provided with permission by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln/ Angie Fox, illustrator/ 2009.


The Clinic Radio Speaker: Listen Online
South Africa’s approach to HIV/AIDS has dramatically changed in recent years. For more than two decades, a combination of government inaction, socio-political conflict, and controversial public health policies led to the situation that South Africa finds itself in today: home to the largest number of people living with HIV. Now the country is trying to make up for lost time, both in prevention and in treatment.

The government has launched an ambitious HIV Counseling and Testing campaign that would include 15 million people by 2011, with the goal of reducing the HIV incidence rate by half. At public health clinics across the country, addressing the science of HIV/AIDS means addressing a litany of social problems, too. Producer Gemma Hooley speaks to scientists, researchers, field workers and patients as South Africa fights to slow the march of the virulent disease. Our program today is called The Clinic.

The photograph of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)was provided with permission from the Nebraska State Museum/ Angie Fox, Ilustrator/ 2005.

January 13 Mosquitoes in Iquitos Radio Speaker: Listen Online
Iquitos, Peru, home to nearly 400,000 people, is a living laboratory. Researchers there are tracing the spread of lethal dengue fever by going door to door in neighborhoods throughout the city. They're mapping the spread of the virus, as well as the mosquitoes that carry it. Producer Dan Charles follows researchers as they try to figure out what people can do to stop it.

The Bucket Radio Speaker: Listen Online
When you lower a bucket into the ocean, from a pier or off the side of a ship, it may well seem to come up containing nothing but clear water. But scientists now know that every teaspoonful of that water can contain a hundred-million tiny viruses. That sounds sinister, but without them the ocean couldn't function. Every day, marine viruses invade bacteria and other organisms, releasing their nutrients to the underwater food chain. Only since the late 1980's have marine biologists been aware of how many viruses are indigenous to the ocean, and how powerful and varied they are. They differ radically in size, shape, and DNA blueprint -- so much so that totally novel DNA keeps being discovered, with implications for anything from anti-aging creams to anti-cancer drugs and evolutionary science. Far from being a bad thing, these amazing marine viruses are useful, dramatic, novel, and dynamic; imagine that all hiding in your bucket of clear water! Producer Judith Kampfner travels from the coast of Plymouth in England to Santa Monica to meet with some of the intrepid pioneers who are on the trail of these new natural marvels.

Photograph of algae, Emiliania Huxleyi, was provided with permission by The Natural History Museum, London (Dr. Jeremy Young) and University of Nebraska-Lincoln (Angie Fox) / 2009.

January 6 After the Forgetting Radio Speaker: Listen Online
This is a story about a Vermont family's experience living with an elderly member's progressive dementia. It is told in a series of interview segments and dinner conversations among the story's three characters, Gregory Sharrow, his husband Bob Hooker, and Greg's mother Marjorie. The story explores the relationship with a son and son-in-law whose names Marjorie can't remember. It addresses the question, what happens to love when there is no more memory? There is no narration in the story. Brooklyn musician Karinne Keithley created music for the story. For more about Karinne Keithley, go to: http://www.fancystitchmachine.org/ Thanks to Rob Rosenthal for his mentorship during the production of this piece.

Hospice Chronicles: Joe and Roger
In 1967, St. Christopher's Hospice – the first modern hospice – opened in a suburb of London. Since then, millions of people around the world have chosen hospice at the end of their lives, with many patients choosing to receive care in their homes. In Hospice Chronicles: Joe and Roger, team Long Haul follows Joe, a volunteer trained in "respite care", giving family members a break from caretaking responsibilities. As Joe, a Buddhist, engages Roger, a devout Christian, in discussions of death and (im)mortality, he finds himself exploring death in a way for which training could not have prepared him.




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